Recycling matters!

We are blessed in Lawrence County to have residents who embrace recycling and all it means for the Earth . . . and our schools.

Storage buildings in place at every public and private school are open around the clock to receive recyclables from the community. Solid Waste Department staff make regular rounds to collect the cardboard, plastic and paper  deposited in them, and the collections are weighed and tallied each year.

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A competition between the schools rewards winners and participants with funds from the Tennessee Department of Transportation’s Litter Grant.  County Executive T.R. Williams spent a large part of the day Wednesday, April 20 delivering checks and his personal thanks to every Lawrence County school.

Sacred Heart Loretto collected the most recyclables over the past year and received $2,000. Its total was an impressive 122,560 pounds, or 61.28 tons. The parochial school always does well in the local competition, and has also won statewide recycling contests sponsored by Eastman Kodak.

SACRED HEART LORETTO Principal Tina Neese with County Executive T.R. Williams.
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County Executive T.R. Williams with SOUTH LAWRENCE ELEMENTARY Assistant Principal Tammy Smith.

South Lawrence Elementary came in second with a collection of 49.34 tons and won $1,500. Leoma Elementary rounded out a trio of southern Lawrence County winners with 48.22 tons and $1,000 in winnings. Ingram Sowell Elementary placed fourth with 39.61 tons and earned $750. New Prospect Elementary finished fifth with 36.55 tons to win $500.

County Executive T.R. Williams with, left to right, LEOMA ELEMENTARY bookkeeper Angela Cox and principal Kathy Burns.
County Executive T.R. Williams with, left to right, LEOMA ELEMENTARY bookkeeper Angela Cox and principal Kathy Burns.

All other schools received $200 each for their participation. Their collections were:

Lawrenceburg Sacred Heart, 34.25 tons

David Crockett Elementary, 31.05 tons

Summertown Elementary, 27.70 tons

Lawrence County High, 27.31 tons

Ethridge Elementary, 26.91 tons

Summertown High, 24.17 tons

Loretto High, 22.34 tons

E.O. Coffman Middle School, 22.16 tons

Lawrenceburg Public, 21.01 tons, and

Bill Egly Seventh Day Adventist School, 1,120 pounds.

Altogether, these Lawrence County schools’ recycling collections totaled 472.46 tons. That’s not only good for the environment, but saves space in our landfill, which extends its life and saves taxpayer dollars. Recyclables are separated by type and sold, which of course generates funds.

Next time you start to throw away that plastic bottle, box or book, remember that you can use it to help your favorite school. Collect recyclables in the yellow bags that are available at the Solid Waste facility and take them to recycling collection centers at any Lawrence County School, at any time.

County Executive T.R. Williams and Administrative Assistant Carla Williams add newspaper to a recycling program bag.
County Executive T.R. Williams and Administrative Assistant Carla Williams add newspaper to a recycling program bag.